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Getting Started with Shared Value

As a follow up to my debut article on Motivated Online, Pairing Passion with Purpose by Creating Shared Value,  we start to explore Enabling Shared Value. First we zoom out to the birds-eye view, illustrating our roadmap at a very high level.  Within each step are numerous powerful methods and frameworks to support your journey and effectively enable your Shared Value strategies.  Then we zoom in and take a worms-eye view to ‘ASK’ the key preliminary questions essential to shaping a Shared Value strategy.

The goal is to put your Shared Value journey into the context of your corporate environment.  In my next article we will focus on the essential “DIALOG” needed to get your Shared Value journey in motion.

Big thanks to the audacious and highly creative folks at Motivated!

The Health Care and Gaming Connection

Not only is cross-fertilizing brilliant ideas a clever innovative approach to solving complex problems, it can also steer you towards strategic growth opportunities.   It was not surprising to me to read about “The Pharma-Gaming Connection” in Locating Your Next Strategic Opportunity via this month’s issue of HBR.  The Health Care industry was well represented at the Gamification Summit in San Fransisco earlier this year and gaming was a hot topic at the recent HiMSS in Orlando.  The article shares examples of ventures seizing this opportunity such as Foldit; an online social game for science geeks based on the challenge of finding the most efficient way to fold proteins in hopes that they can help solve real protein-folding challenges for biopharma companies.  What struck me about the examples the article provided was that none of them were focused on solving the pervasive barriers that stunt growth and innovation in Health Care broadly; issues such as patient adherence, patient privacy, access, and patient experience.  My point is not to diminish the significance of the examples given, in fact these companies are helping pioneer the pathway for us to tackle the more systemic issues.  In essence I want to stress the need for us to target these issues.

I get super excited thinking about leveraging mass collaboration to bring Health Care into the 21st century by cross pollinating principles of Motivational Design, data visualization, and shared value.  As Hans Rosling has said “I am not an optimist, I am a possiblist”.   This is all very doable, in fact it is being done as we speak, smart biopharma companies and Health Care broadly can either chose to help shape this movement or scramble later to catch up.

Do you know of any examples of ventures connecting Health Care and gaming?  Please share if you do…

Buzz-Off!!

I am perplexed by the ever present sensitivity and negativity to “buzzwords”. I think it is cowardly to dismiss or discount something new or something that represents change without reason.  On the other hand, I acknowledge that new words are often misused or abused for impact or simply to be catchy.  “Buzzwords” remind me of what we call “one hit wonders” in the music world.  Only we don’t know if it is a “one hit wonder” until we give it time, we don’t call every new musician with a new song a “one hit wonder”.   Many are, but many are not.  Why don’t we give the same respect to new words?  If they don’t sustain into something meaningful, then label them “buzzwords”.  Not all new words are bad, many sustain to become respected business terms.  I remember when “cloud computing” and “social media” were followed by a dismissive snarl amongst the skeptics.  All I am suggesting here is that we not be quick to judge every new term or word simply because it is gaining airtime but is unproven.  In parallel, we all need to be mindful of over-using new words which can render them annoying.  No different than a catchy new song that you overplay until you are annoyed by the very song you initially loved.

So buzz-off all you new word haters and buzz-down all you new word junkies!  We all lean a little in one direction or the other and I am guilty of the latter, I do love discovering new words!  Which way do you lean?

If you had a crystal ball, which of current new words are certain to be buzz-kill and which ones have sustainability?